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Fellow Spotlight

Welcome to our newest Segal Fellows

In February 2018, we were honored to welcome our newest Segal Fellows, the 2018 Brandeis/Heller Segal Fellow Cohort.

Learn more about these inspiring citizen leaders here.  Our new Fellows (bottom row, left to right) are: John Valinch (Heller MPP/MBA), Gabriel Fontes (Brandeis Junior), Edith Suárez (Heller MPP/MBA), Olivia Nichols (Brandeis Sophomore), Leila Quinn (Heller MPP/MBA), Justus Davis (Brandeis Junior, not pictured), and Madison Matthews (Brandeis Junior, not pictured).

New 2018 Brandeis Fellows with Phyllis Segal

Check out all of Fellows in the Fellows bio page!

Recent Segal Fellow Engagement Opportunities: The White Card

Through the Segal Program, Fellows Wil Jones and Bria Price had an opportunity to see The American Repertory Theatre’s Production of Claudia Rankine’s The White Card in Boston.  The play, set at a dinner party thrown by an influential couple for an up-and-coming artist, raises questions about who was being captured in the art and why. Rankine also wrote the 2014 New York Times best-selling Citizen: An American Lyric.  

Segal Fellows at The White Card

Wil said, “I found Claudia Rankine’s experience, The White Card to be provocative. Rankine’s use of media weaved throughout the show [as well in her novel Citizen] and  impacts the event in a way that makes the categorization of ‘play’ incomplete. The provocation, however, lies not within the subject matter of the charged dinner conversation, nor the questions surrounding the complexities of Black life and art,  but rather within the [character’s] answers to each other and audience reaction, as it relates to the protagonist Charlotte.”

Bria shared that “Rankine’s work connects back to our Segal Citizen Leader Core Competencies, specifically communicating, collaborating, and learning with diverse communities. At the end of the performance, we stayed for a reflection and discussion on the audiences’ perspectives of the play and the characters. The conversations happening were honest and vulnerable, and it was insightful to see and hear how individuals see the progress of racial injustice in our society today. I was encouraged to share this experience with other peers, Fellows, and family. I saw a gleam of hope that impact and change can happen when conversations lean on communication, active listening, and a vision for successful change efforts.”

Wil and Bria stood out and stood up as citizen leaders, sharing their outlooks on the world during the post-play discussion and posing questions about progress to the audience.

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